Tech tip: New & improved treatment plans

In the next couple of weeks, we’re rolling out brand-new, totally redesigned treatment plans. You’re going to love this. The new paperwork adds a ton of new useful information, and really clarifies how phases work. We’ve also managed to cut it down from five pages to a single, Earth-friendly sheet of paper.

Treatment plans: funky & clunky vs. lean & green

Get comfortable, because this tech tip is probably going to be our longest one yet, and you’re going to want to know this stuff.

We’ll start at the top of the treatment plan and work our way down. (Download a sample treatment plan here if you want to follow along.)

Case information

Patient name

Nothing too surprising here. A big readable patient name is followed by the case number, the prescribing doctor, and the date that the current phase was shipped.

(By the way, if your email client usually blocks images, you’ll want to make sure to load them now. Things are about to get very visual.)

Phase graph

Phase graph

The phase graph at the top of each treatment plan gives you a quick overview of the entire case: past, present, and future.

As you know, we make our aligners one phase at a time. A standard phase includes four sets of aligners, and lasts 12 weeks. Each phase is represented as a box on this graph, segmented into four steps. (Phase Zero and the retainer are narrower because they only include one set of aligners.)

Let’s take a closer look at each section of the graph:

Past phases

Past phases

Phases that you’ve already received are represented as gray boxes on the graph.

In this example, a note under phase 3 indicates that it was shipped as a midcourse correction. Don’t worry about the little symbols in phase 1 just yet; we’ll talk about those later.

Current phase

Current phase

The current phase (the one sent with the treatment plan) is filled in green. The phase number above it is big, bold, and also green. In this example, the patient is about to start phase 5, which is also a midcourse correction.

I bet you really want to know about the triangles, square, and X on the first & third step. Just hang tight—it’ll all be clear soon.

Planned phases

Planned phases

The right side of the graph offers a glimpse into the future. Planned phases are represented as green outlines. Here we can see that the final planned phase is phase 6. It’s scheduled to ship around March 28, 2012*, followed by final retainers whenever the doctor requests them (you do request final retainers, don’t you?).

*That asterisk after the shipping date is important. Estimated ship dates are just that—estimates. They change all the time. You really want to wait to schedule appointments until you get an email notifying you that the aligners have shipped. If a patient shows up before the aligners do, no one is happy.

Also remember that this is an estimate of the ship date, not the delivery date.Depending on where you are, UPS Ground delivery can take up to 5 business days. Updated shipping date estimates and tracking numbers are available on ClearComm. Don’t hesitate to use them.

Extra phases

Extra phases

Here’s something you’ve never been able to see before: extra phases. They’re represented by light gray outlines on the graph.

As you know, a certain number of phases are included with each case (3 for Limited, 8 for Full). If a Full case has fewer than 8 phases scheduled, some unused phases are left over. Those extra phases can be used for replacements, midcourse corrections, or refinements. If some phases are still left over when you request the final retainer, they’re donated to the Phase Out program.

These new graphs should help you understand your options. For instance, if you request a midcourse correction, the treatment may use more phases than originally planned. That’s no problem if you have enough unused phases to cover the difference, but if you don’t, you’ll need to pay for the extra phases.

If you request a replacement aligner instead of making one in your office, it will “break” one of your extra phases so it can only be used to make replacements. The shaded boxin the darker gray replacement phase above represents one replacement. The note above the shaded step indicates that it was used to replace step 2A.

Phase-based numbering

Wait a minute. Step 2A?

That’s right, we’re renumbering the aligners to make it more clear which phase they belong to. Instead of steps 13, 14, 15, and 16, you’ll get 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D.

No more mental calculations; you’ll always dispense A & B at the first appointment, and C & D at the second appointment—even after a midcourse correction.

Appointment instructions

Okay, we’re nearing the home stretch, folks. Remember those funny little symbols on the phase graph? Behold! All will be revealed.

First appointment

The sheet includes separate instructions for the first and second appointment of each phase. You’ll notice that each type of procedure is accompanied by a unique symbol:

  • Compliance Checkpoint A green teardrop represents Compliance Checkpoints.
    • When you see these, check for contact between the teeth with dental floss. If they’re not touching, your patient probably hasn’t been wearing their aligners 22 hours a day, and they might not be ready for the next step.
  • 0.2 mm IPR A red triangle represents IPR.
  • Add engager A blue square represents adding an engager
  • Remove engager A small black X represents removing an engager.
  • Extraction A large gray X represents extraction.

On the phase graph, these symbols indicate which procedures are being performed at each appointment. Now if you need to schedule more time for IPR or engagers, you’ll know in advance.

Tooth charts

On the tooth charts below the instructions, those same symbols give you an at-a-glance overview of where those procedures are being performed. If we know that a tooth is missing, we’ll delete it from the graph. The IPR triangles even change width to indicate whether you’re performing 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 millimeters of IPR.

There’s a chart for each step, but procedures will never be recommended on step B or D of a phase (because your patient starts those steps at home).

You can also quickly see which teeth are moving in each step—they’re highlighted in green

Tooth charts

The specific movements are listed below each graph:

Tooth movements

Epilogue

Well, I think that about does it. We covered the whole treatment plan, top to bottom. As you can see, there is a lot of information packed onto that one piece of paper. Hopefully, it will seem pretty straightforward when you start to receive the new paperwork in the next few weeks.

If you want to review this tech tip later, it will be available (like all our tips) right here on our blog. Of course, you can also always contact your account rep for assistance or feedback.

I think I'm going to go have a little lie-down. Until next week…

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