Tech Tip: Using IPR to avoid case revisions

This tech tip is an oldie, but a goodie.

Sending in a case revision before doing some troubleshooting can waste money and chair time. We see a lot of case revisions submitted when unpredictable tooth movements (such as extrusions and rotations) just aren't happening. Teeth need space to complete any type of movement, and when they don't have enough, it can cause tracking or fitting issues. These tight contacts are common and can appear at any time in treatment, due to the nature of teeth and the patient's physiology.

Even if you follow the treatment plan to a T, and the patient is completely compliant, you may still need to perform IPR.

You can avoid submitting an unnecessary case revision by using these IPR techniques:

  • Always check for tight contacts before submitting a case revision. You can easily alleviate tight contacts by hand stripping, as demonstrated in our IPR tutorial video.
  • Take IPR into your own hands! The recommended amounts of IPR in the treatment setup and treatment plan are for guidance only. You are the doctor, and are the one ultimately treating the patient. Small amounts of unscheduled IPR can get treatment back on track much quicker than submitting a lengthy case revision.
  • Use your good sense -- don't perform IPR in a spot where there's already space, even if it's recommended on the treatment plan. Too late? Don't worry, it's an easy fix. At the end of treatment, the spaces caused by doing too much IPR can be closed with a digital power chain in a refinement.
  • If you still have questions, we have articles in our Help Center dedicated to performing IPR and troubleshooting other related issues. Or, you can alway contact a knowledgeable support rep; they will help you review your patient's treatment so you can decide what to do next.

We hope you found this information useful!

Also, don't miss our upcoming advanced training webinar on IPR or our advanced training series of webinars on various topics related to clear aligner treatment.

Until next time...

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